1. Pick up a pen

Mindlessly munching on a bag of chips could result in easily polishing off the whole thing; write down how much you’ve eaten and you’re more likely to practice portion control and lose weight fast. Keeping a food log helps control extra calories in two ways: the combination of plain old reality check (I just ate 30 minutes ago!) and awareness that what you’re putting in your mouth will soon be recorded for posterity. In a recent study, people who kept a food journal lost twice as much weight as those who didn’t. When they combined it with a moderate diet and exercise plan, they lost an average of 13 pounds in 6 months. Journaling also gives you insight on your eating habits, says Dr. Lutes. Do you skip meals? Eat the same during the week as on the weekend? Binge when you’re feeling stressed? “Knowing your routine helps you figure out what changes are right for you,” she adds.

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Do You Have a Hormone Imbalance?

 

Your Hormones, Your Health

Feeling bloated, irritable, or just not your best? A hormone imbalance could be to blame. Hormones are chemical “messengers” that impact the way your cells and organs function. It’s normal for your levels to shift at different times of your life, such as before and during your period or a pregnancy, or during menopause. But some medications and health issues can cause them to go up or down, too.

Irregular Periods

Most women’s periods come every 21 to 35 days. If yours doesn’t arrive around the same time every month, or you skip some months, it might mean that you have too much or too little of certain hormones (estrogen and progesterone). If you’re in your 40s or early 50s — the reason can be perimenopause — the time before menopause. But irregular periods can be a symptom of health problems like polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Talk to your doctor.

Sleep Problems

If you aren’t getting enough shut-eye, or if the sleep you get isn’t good, your hormones could be at play. Progesterone, a hormone released by your ovaries, helps you catch Zzz’s. If your levels are lower than usual, that can make it hard to fall and stay asleep. Low estrogen can trigger hot flashes and night sweats, both of which can make it tough to get the rest you need.

Chronic Acne

A breakout before or during your period is normal. But acne that won’t clear up can be a symptom of hormone problems. An excess of androgens (“male” hormones that both men and women have) can cause your oil glands to overwork. Androgens also affect the skin cells in and around your hair follicles. Both of those things can clog your pores and cause acne.

Memory Fog

Experts aren’t sure exactly how hormones impact your brain. What they do know is that changes in estrogen and progesterone can make your head feel “foggy” and make it harder for you to remember things. Some experts think estrogen might impact brain chemicals called neurotransmitters. Attention and memory problems are especially common during perimenopause and menopause. But they can also be a symptom of other hormone-related conditions, like thyroid disease. Let your doctor know if you’re having trouble thinking clearly.

Belly Problems

Your gut is lined with tiny cells called receptors that respond to estrogen and progesterone. When these hormones are higher or lower than usual, you might notice changes in how you’re digesting food. That’s why diarrhea, stomach pain, bloating, and nausea can crop up or get worse before and during your period. If you’re having digestive woes as well as issues like acne and fatigue, your hormone levels might be off.

Ongoing Fatigue

Are you tired all the time? Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms of a hormone imbalance. Excess progesterone can make you sleepy. And if your thyroid — the butterfly-shaped gland in your neck — makes too little thyroid hormone, it can sap your energy. A simple blood test called a thyroid panel can tell you if your levels are too low. If they are, you can get treated for that.

Mood Swings and Depression

Researchers think drops in hormones or fast changes in their levels can cause moodiness and the blues. Estrogen affects key brain chemicals like serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. But other hormones, that travel the same paths as neurotransmitters, also play a part in how you feel.

Appetite and Weight Gain

When you’re feeling blue or irritated, as you can be when your estrogen levels dip, you may want to eat more. That might be why drops in the hormone are linked to weight gain. The estrogen dip can also impact your body’s levels of leptin, a hunger-revving hormone.

Headaches

Lots of things can trigger these. But for some women, drops in estrogen bring them on. That’s why it’s common for headaches to strike right before or during your period, when estrogen is on the decline. Regular headaches or ones that often surface around the same time each month can be a clue that your levels of this hormone might be shifting.

Vaginal Dryness

It’s normal to have this occasionally. But if you often notice that you’re dry or irritated down there, low estrogen may be the reason. The hormone helps vaginal tissue stay moist and comfortable. If your estrogen drops because of an imbalance, it can reduce vaginal fluids and cause tightness.

Loss of Libido

Most people think of testosterone as a male hormone, but women’s bodies make it, too. If your testosterone levels are lower than usual, you might have less of an interest in sex than you usually do.

Breast Changes

A drop in estrogen can make your breast tissue less dense. And an increase in the hormone can thicken this tissue, even causing new lumps or cysts. Talk to your doctor if you notice breast changes, even if you don’t have any other symptoms that concern you.

 

 

5 Natural Ways to Balance Your Hormones

Many of my patients have found that certain lifestyle changes and simple techniques such as the ones below have allowed them to balance their hormones and reclaim health.

  1. Eat your broccoli. Cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, bok choy, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, and kohlrabi contain a substance called indole-3-carbinol (I3C), which is metabolized in the body to produce diindolylmethane (DIM). Both of these substances help modulate estrogens and have been shown to have some anti-cancer effects, particularly for breast cancer.
  2. Maintain a healthy weight. Excessive adipose (fat) tissue can act as an endocrine organ, producing more estrogen in the body. By maintaining a healthy weight, your body is not stimulated to overproduce certain hormones.
  3. Include phytoestrogens in your diet. Found in soy foods, flax seeds, sunflower seeds, bean sprouts, and legumes such as garbanzo beans and peas, phytoestrogens are plant-based substances that can help balance your hormones naturally.

Although there has been some controversy in the media over the consumption of soy, I do not know of any scientific studies showing that eating soy-containing foods is harmful. My view is that consuming small amounts of soy in the diet can be beneficial. However, I would advise against taking phytoestrogens such as soy as supplements as we do not know enough about the effects of taking these compounds in high doses. Also, I caution against eating processed soy products and soy additives in many foods, but instead encourage the use of traditional soy foods such as tofu, edamame, tempeh, miso, and soy sauce.  Make sure they are organic and non-GMO.

If you have known thyroid disease, I would also caution against eating foods that contain phytoestrogens raw as goitrogens in these foods may interfere with thyroid function. Cooking does neutralize this effect, but avoid consumption within two hours of taking any thyroid medication.

  1. Consider the use of herbal remedies. In my practice, the Ayurvedic herb shatavari has been useful for both menopausal hot flashes and PMS associated with irritability and mood swings. Other herbal remedies have also proven helpful for both physical and psychological symptoms. As each individual is different, always speak with a trained practitioner before using herbal remedies.
  2. Breathe deeply. Doing fifteen  minutes of deep belly breathing twice daily has been shown in several clinical trials to decrease hot flashes and night sweats as well as improve a woman’s sense of well-being. In addition, I encourage women (and men) to learn a mind-quieting technique such as Primordial Sound Meditation, which helps decrease stress hormones and allows the body to function more efficiently.

Addressing lifestyle including diet, physical activity and stress management as well as gaining support from practitioners and loved ones is an excellent start.  In addition to helping with hormonal balance, these mind-body techniques to bring about balance create a greater sense of well being and ultimately optimum health.

Schedule your visit today at Optimal Weight Control & Wellness Center, a medically supervised program designed to cater patients who have excess body fat induced by imbalance hormones.

 

Article References: http://www.webmd.com/

 


 

Pesce, the Italian word for fish, is being associated with people who add aquatic animals to a vegetarian diet. Pescetarians (sometimes called pesco-vegetarians) eat freshwater and saltwater fish and shellfish in addition to the fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, eggs, and dairy vegetarians typically consume.

While it isn’t known how many people follow a pescetarian eating pattern, interest in the impact this diet has on its followers appears to be rising. The combination of the known benefits of a vegetarian lifestyle with the proven health effects of omega-3-fatty-acid-rich fish makes pescetarianism a potentially powerful ally in the interplay between nutrition and long-term health.

Who Are Pescetarians?
“Pescetarians are a diverse group,” says Debra King, MS, RDN, LD, FAND, CEO of Crown Consulting and Web editor for Vegetarian Nutrition. “In my experience, they’re usually very health-conscious individuals. They’re looking to take control of their health through the food choices they make.” For some, pescetarianism may be a stepping stone on the way to true vegetarianism, or a compromise for vegetarians who feel the need to add a protein source readily available in business or social settings.

“People who have health problems or want to lose weight may try pescetarianism,” says Janis Jibrin, MS, RD, author of The Pescetarian Plan. “They’ve read about the detrimental health effects of red meat and the benefits of plant-based diets and omega-3 fatty acids in fish, and are looking for a convenient and doable way to make healthful choices.”

Components of the Diet
“The pescetarian diet is similar to the traditional Mediterranean diet: plant-based, with fish serving as the primary animal protein,” says Sharon Palmer, RDN, nutrition editor of Today’s Dietitian and author of Plant-Powered for Life. Like a Mediterranean eating pattern, a healthful pescetarian diet is loaded with fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts, and legumes. “It can be Mediterranean-style,” Jibrin says, “but one could just as easily have a Nordic- or Japanese-based pescetarian diet. It’s an extremely flexible way to eat. Also, most pescetarians, like vegetarians, include both dairy and eggs in their diets.”

Health Benefits
“There’s definitely evidence that a dietary pattern like this favorably impacts chronic disease,” Kris-Etherton says. In 2013, an analysis of the Adventist Health Study-2 reported that the mortality rate was lower among pescetarians when compared with nonvegetarians.1

“In addition, the study found that pescetarians had lower levels of blood cholesterol and blood pressure, as well as [decreased] risk of diabetes, blood pressure, and metabolic syndrome compared with nonvegetarians,” Palmer says. “They even have a lower carbon footprint.”

While few studies look specifically at pescetarianism, Jibrin says there are “boatloads of relevant studies” on the similar Mediterranean diet, vegetarianism, and the benefits of eating fish. “Lower risk of heart disease, less dementia and depression, smarter kids, lower rates of type 2 diabetes and cancer—the potential benefits are truly impressive,” Jibrin says.

 

One of the key health-promoting components of a pescetarian diet is the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids found in fish (particularly fatty fish). “There are many good epidemiologic studies showing that higher consumption of fish and omega-3 fatty acids is associated with a lower risk of heart disease,” Kris-Etherton says.

“Collectively, the evidence to date strongly suggests benefits of fish/seafood and marine omega-3 fatty acids for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease.” Data from the Cardiovascular Health Study indicated that in older adults, higher dietary intake of DHA and EPA (the long-chain fatty acids found in fish) may lower the risk of fatal heart attacks, and that higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids in the blood are associated with a lower incidence of congestive heart failure.2,3 “Some recent controlled clinical trials in patients with heart disease haven’t demonstrated a beneficial effect of fish oil,” Kris-Etherton notes. “For secondary prevention in coronary patients, modern pharmacotherapy appears to be of greater benefit over marine omega-3 fatty acids.”

Other research shows that eating fish may be good for the brain as well as the heart. “A long-term study in the UK [indicated] that children born to women who ate at least 12 oz of fish per week during pregnancy had higher IQs and better social, fine motor, and communication skills than kids whose moms ate fewer than 12 oz, and a study by Chicago’s Rush Institute for Healthy Aging found that over a four-year period, Chicagoans aged 65 to 94 who had at least one fish meal per week had a 60% lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease compared with those who rarely or never ate fish,” Jibrin says.

“It’s not just the presence of fish. It’s the presence of all those plant foods, too,” Palmer says. “This is a huge aspect of the health benefits seen in this diet style.” In a 2009 study, Fraser and colleagues concluded, “There is convincing evidence that vegetarians have lower rates of coronary heart disease, largely explained by low LDL cholesterol, probable lower rates of hypertension and diabetes mellitus, and lower prevalence of obesity. Overall, their cancer rates appear to be moderately lower than others living in the same communities, and life expectancy appears to be greater.”4 A study on the effects of a vegetarian diet on the risk of developing type 2 diabetes concluded that all variants of plant-based diets, including pescetarian, were associated with a substantially lower risk of type 2 diabetes and lower BMI than nonvegetarian diets.5 “It makes sense,” Palmer says. “As you increase your intake of plant foods, decrease your intake of red and processed meats, and prioritize fish—animal foods that contain better fat profiles and omega-3s—you’re likely to improve your overall health.”

Too Much Fish?
The presence of mercury and other toxins in fish, combined with environmental and sustainability concerns, raises questions about the viability of a fish-and-seafood-based diet. “Some studies have shown that the benefits of eating fish outweigh the risks related to mercury,” Palmer says. “Generally, the larger and more predatory the fish, the higher the mercury. I think dietitians can educate consumers to eat lower on the food chain when it comes to fish.” The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend adults eat 8 oz or more of seafood per week. Pregnant and breast-feeding women should aim for 8 oz to 12 oz of a variety of seafood, but should limit albacore tuna to 6 oz per week, and avoid tilefish, swordfish, shark, and King mackerel due to their high mercury content. The guidelines specifically recommend salmon, anchovies, herring, sardines, Pacific oysters, trout, and Atlantic and Pacific mackerel (not King mackerel) as choices higher in EPA and DHA and lower in mercury.6 These guidelines can fit well with a pescetarian eating pattern. “It’s important to remember that a pescetarian diet doesn’t mean that one should eat fish three times a day,” Palmer says. “It’s a vegetarian diet that includes fish. So that means lots of meals that are based on plant proteins, too—beans, lentils, tofu, nuts, seeds.”

When advocating for an increase in seafood intake, it’s essential to consider sustainability. According to the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch, overfishing, lack of effective management, and consumption habits all have contributed to a serious decline in wild fish. Seafoodwatch.org states that “Some 90% of the world’s fisheries are either fully fished or in decline.”7 “More and more experts and organizations, including Monterey Bay Aquarium and World Wildlife Fund, are indicating that sustainably farmed seafood has a role,” Palmer says. “Dietitians need to help their patients not only find good, safe sources of fish, but also help clients prioritize sustainable choices.” (See “Eating Seafood Sustainably” in Today’s Dietitian‘s June 2012 issue.)

Helping Clients Make the Switch
Jibrin recommends a pescetarian diet to clients who are interested in trying a more plant-based diet but aren’t ready to become vegetarian or vegan. “It’s a compromise that doesn’t compromise their health,” Jibrin says. According to Palmer, pescetarianism is a simple transition into a more plant-based lifestyle. “In my experience, I see many people who like to make small incremental changes in their diet and lifestyle, such as giving up red meat, doing Meatless Monday, or becoming pescetarian. They may find that as they try these lifestyle changes, they’re ready to embrace even more plant-based meals during the week.”

Variety is important in any diet, and so is overall diet quality, King says. While the components of a pescetarian eating plan are healthful, King says that eating fish seven days per week, consuming uncontrolled portions, and munching on deep-fried fish sticks still aren’t good choices. “I think it’s important to educate clients that a pescetarian diet does not mean they must eat fish at every meal,” Palmer says. “It means that a person enjoys lots of plant-based meals—vegetarian lasagna, veggie chili with cornbread, tofu vegetable stir-fry with brown rice—in addition to a few meals during the week based on fish.”

Many health-conscious Americans are looking for a dietary pattern that will give them the maximum proven nutritional benefit with the minimum sacrifice and inconvenience. With its focus on plant-based foods, pescetarianism delivers a powerful portion of vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals, fiber, and healthful fats. Adding fish and other seafood not only boosts intake of heart-healthy long-chain omega-3 fatty acids but also increases the variety of available lean proteins. Some guidance on how to build plant-based meals and choose sustainable, low-mercury fish can ease clients’ transition to delicious, nutritious, health-promoting pescetarianism.

— Judith C. Thalheimer, RD, LDN, is a freelance nutrition writer, a community educator, and the principal of JTRD Nutrition Education Services.

 

Sample Pescetarian Diet 1200 Calorie Meal Plan


Breakfast – Oatmeal and Eggs – 254 calories

1 packet high fiber oatmeal
2 hard boiled egg whites
1 cup or piece of fruit


Lunch – Tuna Sandwich – 350 calories

2 slices 100% whole wheat light bread
Tuna fish (4 ounces)
1 tablespoon light mayo
Light string cheese
1/2 cup baby carrots


Snack – Cheese and Crackers – 125 calories

Laughing Cow Cheese Wedge
19 Special K Crackers


Dinner – Tofu and Broccoli over Pasta – 435 calories

Tofu and Broccoli
3 ounces firm tofu & 1/2 cup broccoli
1 cup whole wheat pasta
Garden salad
2 tablespoon light balsamic


Dessert – No Sugar Added Fudgsicle – 40 calories

No Sugar Added Fudgsicle

Sample Pescetarian Diet 1500 Calorie Meal Plan


Breakfast – Oatmeal and Eggs – 394 calories

1 packet high fiber oatmeal
2 hard boiled egg whites
1/4 cup nuts


Snack AM – Fruit – 60 calories

1 cup cut fruit or 1 piece of fruit


Lunch – Tuna Sandwich – 350 calories

2 slices 100% whole wheat light bread
Tuna fish (4 ounces)
1 tablespoon light mayo
Light string cheese
1/2 cup baby carrots


Snack – Cheese and Crackers – 125 calories

Laughing Cow Cheese Wedge
19 Special K Crackers


Dinner – Tofu and Broccoli Over Pasta – 475 calories

Tofu and Broccoli
4 ounces firm tofu & 1/2 cup broccoli
1 cup whole wheat pasta
2 cups garden salad
2 tablespoons light balsamic


Dessert – Popcorn – 100 calories

1 mini bag microwave popcorn

 

 

 

 

 

Article originally posted at http://www.todaysdietitian.com/


Maintaining a healthy weight is a key consideration for good health. This Summer when many of us try to drop a few pounds we go about it in the boring way.

These easy, calorie burning exercises are perfect for summer and can all be done with FUN and without going to the gym!

Ditch the gym

You don’t have to train like an athlete to stay fit this summer. Just try these outdoor activities to burn calories and keep your body toned without hitting the gym.

All activities are calculated for a 150-pound woman performing the activity for 30 minutes.

 

 

 

Beach volleyball

If you’re lucky enough to live near a beach, this sport is a great way to get your heart rate up, make friends, and tone your legs, shoulders, and core. And because it’s harder to move in the sand, you get extra calorie burn.

If you’re inland, many parks and even some gyms have sand courts that offer similar benefits.

Calories burned: 272

What you burned off: A 16-ounce Protein Berry Workout smoothie from Jamba Juice

Gardening

Burn calories while making your yard more beautiful. Constantly bending and squatting to reach plants is great for your glutes, and your garden will be the envy of your neighbors.

Calories burned: 136 calories

What you burned off: A serving of Baked Lays with 2 tablespoons of salsa

Surfing

Simply playing in the surf lets you burn calories even as you cool off. To get a better workout, be sure to paddle hard past the breakers to increase your heart rate.

Calories burned: 102 calories

What you burned off: 1/2 cup sliced strawberries and 1/2 cup fat-free vanilla yogurt

Tennis

Pick up your racket and challenge your friend, neighbor, or spouse to a game of tennis. Running around the court allows you to sneak in an aerobic workout. Plus, hitting the ball is a great arm toner.

Calories burned: 272 calories

What you burned off: Half of a Smoked Turkey Breast on Country Bread from Panera Bread

 

Bicycling (light)

Biking can be a great way to get around as well as to tone your quads and hamstrings. A light ride burns more calories than walking, and riding up hills will keep your legs jiggle-free.

Calories burned: 204 calories

What you burned off: 1/2 cup of Häagen-Dazs coffee lowfat frozen yogurt

 

Frisbee

Playing Frisbee can be more than just a leisurely activity. A light game can keep you fit, and if you get a team together for a game of ultimate Frisbee, you will burn 272 calories in just 30 minutes.

Calories burned: 102 calories

What you burned off: An ice-cold Miller Light

 

In-line skating

Break out your roller blades and hit the pavement for a cardio workout that also tones your legs, hips, and glutes. Plus, the faster you go, the better the breeze.

Calories burned: 168 calories (at a leisurely pace of 8 mph)

What you burned off: One ground sirloin slider with relish

Swimming leisurely

Cool off and enjoy this refreshing low-impact activity. And you don’t have to be an expert in butterfly to torch calories. Moving through the water even at a slow pace gives you an aerobic workout that tones your entire body.

Calories burned: 204 calories

What you burned off: 33 Blue Diamond Lime ‘N Chili almonds

Sightseeing

Out of town and no gym? See the sights by walking the streets of whichever city or town you’re visiting. When possible, hit the hills to tighten up your hamstrings and glutes.

Calories burned: 129 calories (3.5 mph pace)

What you burned off: A Citrus Shrimp Refresher made with shrimp, cucumber, avocado, and grapefruit

Scuba diving

If you’re lucky enough to take a tropical vacation, make time for this exciting and eye-opening exercise. And if scuba diving is not your forte, you can go snorkeling. It lets you burn 170 calories in the same amount of time.

Calories burned: 238 calories

What you burned off: An Apricot Clif bar

Kayaking

A sightseeing tour by kayak is a unique way to explore your surroundings—and a deceptively effective way to work on your six-pack. To propel the boat forward, you need to twist your torso like a wind-up spring in addition to paddling with your arms.

Calories burned: 179

What you burned off: A glass of this red sangria

 

Stand-up paddle boarding (SUP)

Balancing on a board that floats in the water may look difficult, but it’s actually pretty easy once you get the hang of it. Paddling tones your biceps and triceps and engages the muscles in your core and back.

Calories burned: 200

What you burned off: A Kind Dark Chocolate Nuts and Sea Salt Bar

Horseback riding

When you saddle up, it isn’t just the horse doing all the work. You need to engage your core and squeeze the horse with your inner thighs in order to stay upright. Your butt and the rest of your legs will feel the burn, too, especially when the horse picks up the pace.

Calories burned: 143

What you burned off: Two scrambled eggs

Golf

Tee yourself up to burn fat by leaving the golf cart at the clubhouse. A leisurely game turns into more of a cardiovascular and strength workout when you carry your clubs from hole to hole.

Calories burned: 161

What you burned off: A slice of whole-wheat toast with a quarter of an avocado smashed on top

Lawn games

Lawn games like croquet, Bocce, and cornhole don’t seem strenuous, but all that crouching down to pick up balls and bean bags helps lift your butt and tone your thighs.

Calories burned: 90

What you burned off: A peach-flavored Edy’s Outshine Frozen Fruit Bar

 

 

Article Reference: http://www.health.com/


Comment to WIN and become our next VIP Member!!! Just answer 2 simple questions and comment at any of our social media accounts- Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.

 

Question 1: What is your reason to lose weight for long term?

Question 2: Why do you think you deserve to be our next VIP member?

WE WILL BE CHOOSING 3 LUCKY WINNERS!!!

As our VIP Member, you will receive exclusive benefits that are not available to standard members, such as FREE initial consultations with OWC packet, FREE follow-up nutritional counseling for 6 months to 1 year depending on your weight goal plus 15% OFF on all OWC products including prescribed medications, supplements and injections.

✓ VIP privilege is NON TRANSFERABLE.

✓ Only one entry per comment.

✓ Must complete 2 questions and use hashtag #OPTIMALWEIGHTCONTROLVIPMEMBER

All participants must be:

  1. 18 years old and above.
  2. Live in Los Angeles, San Bernandino and Orange County or nearby cities.

Final entry will be on July 31st, 2016. We will announce our winner on Aug 5TH, 2016 in our website.

To know more about our summer social media contest and our medically supervised weight management program please contact us atoptimalweightcontrol@gmail.com


How Many Grams of Carbs per Day to Lose Weight?

Daily Grams for a Low-Carb Diet

The Institute of Medicine determines the amount of carbs and other nutrients you need each day to stay active and healthy, but it hasn’t yet developed recommendations for a low-carb diet. Even though a standardized definition doesn’t exist, most experts say a lower-carb diet consists of 130 grams or fewer daily. For comparison, a regular meal plan should include 225 to 325 grams of carbs daily, based on a 2,000-calorie diet, according to Institute of Medicine guidelines.
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If you’re trying to drop a few pounds fast, these 10 expert tips will make it easy for you to lose the weight quickly.

 

 

  1. Eat a high-protein breakfast. Eating a high-protein breakfast has been shown to reduce cravings and calorie intake throughout the day.

 


2. Avoid sugary drinks and fruit juice.
These are the most fattening things you can put into your body, and avoiding them can help you lose weight.

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If you’ve been spending any time at the gym, you’ve probably seen (or done) more than a few sets of these strength-training moves. These exercises are trainer and fitness-buff favorites for balancing and strengthening the body; they are also effective when it comes to shaping, toning, and whittling. Learn how to do these essential exercises in time to add them to your shape-up routine!

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At Optimal Weight Control we recommend that you shop only once a week. Use the list below to get everything you need, so you won’t have to go into  —the supermarket— unplanned…during your diet week.Here’s everything you need, to lose 2-5 pounds each week.Organize your grocery shopping list by aisle. Follow these tips for filling that list with the healthiest foods from each aisle.

1. Bakery and Bread

On Your List:

  • Whole wheat bread, pita pockets, and English muffins
  • Whole-grain flour tortillas

Look for the words “whole wheat” or “whole wheat flour” as the first ingredient on the label.

Choose whole-grain breads that contain at least 3 to 4 grams of fiber and have fewer than 100 calories per slice.

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Are you up or down? It’s not just your mood, but also your weight that can be affected by depression. These tips can help you regain balance.

4-obese-man-is-sad-600x350

Which comes first, obesity or depression? Just like “the chicken or the egg” scenario, the underlying problem with depression and weight gain (or weight loss) can be hard to tell. Symptoms of depression and weight management issues are linked, and the relationship is a two-way street. In fact, a study done in the Netherlands found that obesity increases the risk for depression in initially non-depressed people by 55 percent, and depression increases the risk for obesity in initially normal-weight people by 58 percent.
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