1 . Slim Down Detox Water

Two hours before drinking, combine grapefruit, lemon, lime and cucumbers into a pitcher. The drink only takes 10 minutes to prepare and yields 8 servings of this diuretic dream, which guarantees that all moisture will be rapidly flushed from the system.

The fat-burning enzymes of grapefruit plus the healing properties of citrus that calm the internal digestive tract leave you with an all-around healthy detox.

2. Cucumber Detox

Cucumbers promote a state of physiological purification and also make for an extra refreshing drink – perfect for the warmer months! Combine all your ingredients in a mason jar and let the mixture sit for five minutes before drinking.

3. Lemon Ginger Detox

While lemon is known to promote healthy digestion, this drink becomes a digestive wonder when ginger is added. Special compounds in ginger called shogaols combat nausea and promote healthy intestinal wellness, even battling cancer in the internal organs.

 

4. Blueberry Orange Detox

Packed with antioxidants, Vitamin C and fiber, this delicious drink is perfect to eradicate free radicals and ulcers in the body.

5. Watermelon Detox

You’re about to love watermelon even more. Watermelon contain lycopene, which acts as a strong antioxidant and is known to foster anti-inflammatory effects. Amino acids are also provided to aid in blood flow and cardiovascular well-being, making this the perfect drink for fitness lovers!

6. Pineapple Detox

Combine 2 sticks of sugar cane and 5 chunks of pineapple into 2 liters of water for this sweet detox. Pineapples are meant to enhance meditative properties, assisting in the expel of toxins.

7. Raspberry Mint Detox

Not only does this drink sound delicious, but it has a double-whammy of health benefits. While the raspberry kicks out unwanted agents in the body, the mint cleanses and clears the stomach, making weight loss easy and painless. Plus…this sweet treat has essentially no calories and an extremely addictive flavor.

8. Fat Burning Apple Detox

Struggling with unwanted fat? This is the detox for you! Apple cider vinegar is the main ingredient here, helping you stay full and focused, while the added cinnamon boosts your metabolism and makes it impossible for excess fat to accumulate.

9. Aloe Detox

Sounds weird…aloe is a plant, right? Yes, but that doesn’t mean you can’t eat it! Extract the aloe from the plant  leaves and combine the ooze into a lemon water drink. The result? An energy boosting drink that heals the body from the inside out. (Note: pregnant women are not advised to ingest aloe…but to the rest of you, aloe on.)

10. Strawberry Detox

For fans of all things strawberries, this detox drink is for you. A naturally sweet drink, strawberries provide you with organic, all-day energy and trick your brain into thinking you’re having an indulgent dessert!

11. Blueberry Lavender Detox

Again…drinking a plant? Absolutely! While enjoying the physical benefits of blueberries, your mind enjoys clarity and energy with robust sprigs of lavender in your drink.

12. Soda Detox

You love soda, but you know it’s the not the best thing for you. A compromise? This detox soda water, which combines sparkling water (or seltzer), apple cider vinegar and the citrus of your choice, is the perfect soda substitute.

13. Iced Green Tea Detox

These Chinese tea leaves have the best antioxidants, kicking out poisonous toxins and providing a healthy dose of caffeine for metabolism-boosting weight loss.

14. Belly Slimming Detox

Speeding up digestion with strawberries and curbing your appetite with basil, this drink is the best route to a tight tummy. Plus, the cucumber has properties to give you glowing, lovely skin!

15. Strawberry Lemon Detox

Yum, strawberry lemonade. Opt for this healthy version by using natural fruits and none of the pesky sugar.

16. Stress Relieving Detox

The holidays might be over…but that doesn’t mean your stress is. Take a deep breathe and chug this calming detox, guaranteed to calm the body and reduce stress levels with Vitamins A, E, C and K.

17. Strawberry Kiwi Detox

Strawberry kiwi, a classic combination. But little did you know that kiwi also kicks butt for your health, too! With tons of dietary fiber and Vitamin C, this exotic fruit removes excess salt from the body, getting rid of a huge health hazard.

18. Blackberry Sage Detox

Sage calms the tummy while blackberries bring the Vitamin A and C to the party. This combination has been found to help post-menopausal women and survivors of breast cancer recovering from chemotherapy.

19. Cinnamon Detox

This Dr. Oz recipe uses cinnamon to really kick your metabolism into overdrive! Look at this way, the faster your metabolism, the faster you burn pesky fat.

20. Orange, Blueberry and Lavender Detox

Besides having a delicious combination of ingredients, this drink packs so much punch with antioxidants and vitamins that you’ll have energy to last you through your whole work day!

21. Detox Punch

If you’re sick of boring old water, try this flavorful juice detox! This drink has all the health benefits and double the delicious taste.

22. Vegan Strawberry Lemonade Detox

This detox drink has all the benefits of strawberry and lemon but with even less sugar! It’s also friendly for all our vegan friends out there!

 

 

Article Reference: www.tiphero.com


 

Pesce, the Italian word for fish, is being associated with people who add aquatic animals to a vegetarian diet. Pescetarians (sometimes called pesco-vegetarians) eat freshwater and saltwater fish and shellfish in addition to the fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, eggs, and dairy vegetarians typically consume.

While it isn’t known how many people follow a pescetarian eating pattern, interest in the impact this diet has on its followers appears to be rising. The combination of the known benefits of a vegetarian lifestyle with the proven health effects of omega-3-fatty-acid-rich fish makes pescetarianism a potentially powerful ally in the interplay between nutrition and long-term health.

Who Are Pescetarians?
“Pescetarians are a diverse group,” says Debra King, MS, RDN, LD, FAND, CEO of Crown Consulting and Web editor for Vegetarian Nutrition. “In my experience, they’re usually very health-conscious individuals. They’re looking to take control of their health through the food choices they make.” For some, pescetarianism may be a stepping stone on the way to true vegetarianism, or a compromise for vegetarians who feel the need to add a protein source readily available in business or social settings.

“People who have health problems or want to lose weight may try pescetarianism,” says Janis Jibrin, MS, RD, author of The Pescetarian Plan. “They’ve read about the detrimental health effects of red meat and the benefits of plant-based diets and omega-3 fatty acids in fish, and are looking for a convenient and doable way to make healthful choices.”

Components of the Diet
“The pescetarian diet is similar to the traditional Mediterranean diet: plant-based, with fish serving as the primary animal protein,” says Sharon Palmer, RDN, nutrition editor of Today’s Dietitian and author of Plant-Powered for Life. Like a Mediterranean eating pattern, a healthful pescetarian diet is loaded with fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts, and legumes. “It can be Mediterranean-style,” Jibrin says, “but one could just as easily have a Nordic- or Japanese-based pescetarian diet. It’s an extremely flexible way to eat. Also, most pescetarians, like vegetarians, include both dairy and eggs in their diets.”

Health Benefits
“There’s definitely evidence that a dietary pattern like this favorably impacts chronic disease,” Kris-Etherton says. In 2013, an analysis of the Adventist Health Study-2 reported that the mortality rate was lower among pescetarians when compared with nonvegetarians.1

“In addition, the study found that pescetarians had lower levels of blood cholesterol and blood pressure, as well as [decreased] risk of diabetes, blood pressure, and metabolic syndrome compared with nonvegetarians,” Palmer says. “They even have a lower carbon footprint.”

While few studies look specifically at pescetarianism, Jibrin says there are “boatloads of relevant studies” on the similar Mediterranean diet, vegetarianism, and the benefits of eating fish. “Lower risk of heart disease, less dementia and depression, smarter kids, lower rates of type 2 diabetes and cancer—the potential benefits are truly impressive,” Jibrin says.

 

One of the key health-promoting components of a pescetarian diet is the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids found in fish (particularly fatty fish). “There are many good epidemiologic studies showing that higher consumption of fish and omega-3 fatty acids is associated with a lower risk of heart disease,” Kris-Etherton says.

“Collectively, the evidence to date strongly suggests benefits of fish/seafood and marine omega-3 fatty acids for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease.” Data from the Cardiovascular Health Study indicated that in older adults, higher dietary intake of DHA and EPA (the long-chain fatty acids found in fish) may lower the risk of fatal heart attacks, and that higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids in the blood are associated with a lower incidence of congestive heart failure.2,3 “Some recent controlled clinical trials in patients with heart disease haven’t demonstrated a beneficial effect of fish oil,” Kris-Etherton notes. “For secondary prevention in coronary patients, modern pharmacotherapy appears to be of greater benefit over marine omega-3 fatty acids.”

Other research shows that eating fish may be good for the brain as well as the heart. “A long-term study in the UK [indicated] that children born to women who ate at least 12 oz of fish per week during pregnancy had higher IQs and better social, fine motor, and communication skills than kids whose moms ate fewer than 12 oz, and a study by Chicago’s Rush Institute for Healthy Aging found that over a four-year period, Chicagoans aged 65 to 94 who had at least one fish meal per week had a 60% lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease compared with those who rarely or never ate fish,” Jibrin says.

“It’s not just the presence of fish. It’s the presence of all those plant foods, too,” Palmer says. “This is a huge aspect of the health benefits seen in this diet style.” In a 2009 study, Fraser and colleagues concluded, “There is convincing evidence that vegetarians have lower rates of coronary heart disease, largely explained by low LDL cholesterol, probable lower rates of hypertension and diabetes mellitus, and lower prevalence of obesity. Overall, their cancer rates appear to be moderately lower than others living in the same communities, and life expectancy appears to be greater.”4 A study on the effects of a vegetarian diet on the risk of developing type 2 diabetes concluded that all variants of plant-based diets, including pescetarian, were associated with a substantially lower risk of type 2 diabetes and lower BMI than nonvegetarian diets.5 “It makes sense,” Palmer says. “As you increase your intake of plant foods, decrease your intake of red and processed meats, and prioritize fish—animal foods that contain better fat profiles and omega-3s—you’re likely to improve your overall health.”

Too Much Fish?
The presence of mercury and other toxins in fish, combined with environmental and sustainability concerns, raises questions about the viability of a fish-and-seafood-based diet. “Some studies have shown that the benefits of eating fish outweigh the risks related to mercury,” Palmer says. “Generally, the larger and more predatory the fish, the higher the mercury. I think dietitians can educate consumers to eat lower on the food chain when it comes to fish.” The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend adults eat 8 oz or more of seafood per week. Pregnant and breast-feeding women should aim for 8 oz to 12 oz of a variety of seafood, but should limit albacore tuna to 6 oz per week, and avoid tilefish, swordfish, shark, and King mackerel due to their high mercury content. The guidelines specifically recommend salmon, anchovies, herring, sardines, Pacific oysters, trout, and Atlantic and Pacific mackerel (not King mackerel) as choices higher in EPA and DHA and lower in mercury.6 These guidelines can fit well with a pescetarian eating pattern. “It’s important to remember that a pescetarian diet doesn’t mean that one should eat fish three times a day,” Palmer says. “It’s a vegetarian diet that includes fish. So that means lots of meals that are based on plant proteins, too—beans, lentils, tofu, nuts, seeds.”

When advocating for an increase in seafood intake, it’s essential to consider sustainability. According to the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch, overfishing, lack of effective management, and consumption habits all have contributed to a serious decline in wild fish. Seafoodwatch.org states that “Some 90% of the world’s fisheries are either fully fished or in decline.”7 “More and more experts and organizations, including Monterey Bay Aquarium and World Wildlife Fund, are indicating that sustainably farmed seafood has a role,” Palmer says. “Dietitians need to help their patients not only find good, safe sources of fish, but also help clients prioritize sustainable choices.” (See “Eating Seafood Sustainably” in Today’s Dietitian‘s June 2012 issue.)

Helping Clients Make the Switch
Jibrin recommends a pescetarian diet to clients who are interested in trying a more plant-based diet but aren’t ready to become vegetarian or vegan. “It’s a compromise that doesn’t compromise their health,” Jibrin says. According to Palmer, pescetarianism is a simple transition into a more plant-based lifestyle. “In my experience, I see many people who like to make small incremental changes in their diet and lifestyle, such as giving up red meat, doing Meatless Monday, or becoming pescetarian. They may find that as they try these lifestyle changes, they’re ready to embrace even more plant-based meals during the week.”

Variety is important in any diet, and so is overall diet quality, King says. While the components of a pescetarian eating plan are healthful, King says that eating fish seven days per week, consuming uncontrolled portions, and munching on deep-fried fish sticks still aren’t good choices. “I think it’s important to educate clients that a pescetarian diet does not mean they must eat fish at every meal,” Palmer says. “It means that a person enjoys lots of plant-based meals—vegetarian lasagna, veggie chili with cornbread, tofu vegetable stir-fry with brown rice—in addition to a few meals during the week based on fish.”

Many health-conscious Americans are looking for a dietary pattern that will give them the maximum proven nutritional benefit with the minimum sacrifice and inconvenience. With its focus on plant-based foods, pescetarianism delivers a powerful portion of vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals, fiber, and healthful fats. Adding fish and other seafood not only boosts intake of heart-healthy long-chain omega-3 fatty acids but also increases the variety of available lean proteins. Some guidance on how to build plant-based meals and choose sustainable, low-mercury fish can ease clients’ transition to delicious, nutritious, health-promoting pescetarianism.

— Judith C. Thalheimer, RD, LDN, is a freelance nutrition writer, a community educator, and the principal of JTRD Nutrition Education Services.

 

Sample Pescetarian Diet 1200 Calorie Meal Plan


Breakfast – Oatmeal and Eggs – 254 calories

1 packet high fiber oatmeal
2 hard boiled egg whites
1 cup or piece of fruit


Lunch – Tuna Sandwich – 350 calories

2 slices 100% whole wheat light bread
Tuna fish (4 ounces)
1 tablespoon light mayo
Light string cheese
1/2 cup baby carrots


Snack – Cheese and Crackers – 125 calories

Laughing Cow Cheese Wedge
19 Special K Crackers


Dinner – Tofu and Broccoli over Pasta – 435 calories

Tofu and Broccoli
3 ounces firm tofu & 1/2 cup broccoli
1 cup whole wheat pasta
Garden salad
2 tablespoon light balsamic


Dessert – No Sugar Added Fudgsicle – 40 calories

No Sugar Added Fudgsicle

Sample Pescetarian Diet 1500 Calorie Meal Plan


Breakfast – Oatmeal and Eggs – 394 calories

1 packet high fiber oatmeal
2 hard boiled egg whites
1/4 cup nuts


Snack AM – Fruit – 60 calories

1 cup cut fruit or 1 piece of fruit


Lunch – Tuna Sandwich – 350 calories

2 slices 100% whole wheat light bread
Tuna fish (4 ounces)
1 tablespoon light mayo
Light string cheese
1/2 cup baby carrots


Snack – Cheese and Crackers – 125 calories

Laughing Cow Cheese Wedge
19 Special K Crackers


Dinner – Tofu and Broccoli Over Pasta – 475 calories

Tofu and Broccoli
4 ounces firm tofu & 1/2 cup broccoli
1 cup whole wheat pasta
2 cups garden salad
2 tablespoons light balsamic


Dessert – Popcorn – 100 calories

1 mini bag microwave popcorn

 

 

 

 

 

Article originally posted at http://www.todaysdietitian.com/


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To know more about our summer social media contest and our medically supervised weight management program please contact us atoptimalweightcontrol@gmail.com


Why Are We Fat? Is It Gluttony, or Is Your Fat Actually Hungry?

What if everything you ever learned about weight loss was wrong? What if losing weight has nothing to do with calories—counting them or cutting them out by sheer willpower? What if, in fact, most health professionals (including doctors and dietitians), our own government and especially the food industry are giving us weight loss advice guaranteed to make us fat?

Here’s their mantra: “Eat less and exercise more. The secret to weight loss is energy balance. There are no good or bad calories. It’s all about moderation.”

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It’s possible to lose weight on any schedule. Wise food choices and regular exercise are especially important for shift workers — though it can be difficult. It’s a huge challenge. You will find it to be more of a challenge if you are working the night shift. There are several factors that go into making this shift less conducive to a weight loss and fitness-focused mindset. Here’s how to push through those obstacles to achieve your weight loss goals.
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10 tips to creating healthy, active events

Eating healthy and being physically active can be a fun part of parties and events. Great gatherings are easy to have when tasty, healthy foods from all the food groups are offered in a fun, active environment. Above all, focus on enjoying friends and family

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In this post, we’ll explore what Tim Ferriss refer to as the “slow-carb diet”.

Here are the four simple rules I followed…

Rule #1: Avoid “white” carbohydrates

Avoid any carbohydrate that is — or can be — white. The following foods are thus prohibited, except for within 1.5 hours of finishing a resistance-training workout of at least 20 minutes in length: bread, rice, cereal, potatoes, pasta, and fried food with breading. If you avoid eating anything white, you’ll be safe.
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When it comes to weight loss, you know that snacking can be an important tool. Having a little something-something every few hours keeps your metabolism humming and your blood sugar on an even keel.

Smart snacking can work wonders on your waistline, but it can be a challenge to find options that keep thesugar low and the protein and fiber high (who wants to read nutrition labels when you’re hungry?). This list of the healthiest snacks in the supermarket. Each will provide a slow, steady supply of calories to keep you full all day—and lean for life.

Best Fiber Bar: Fiber One Chewy Bars Oats & Peanut Butter


Per bar: 150 calories, 4.5 g fat, 9 g sugars, 3 g protein, 9 g fiber

With about a third of your day’s recommended fiber intake, this is the ideal snack for those days when your produce and whole grain intake are below par, and you want to keep things, well, moving.

 

 

Best Whole Wheat Cracker: Triscuit Original


Per 6 crackers: 120 calories, 4 g fat, 20 g carbohydrates, 3 g fiber

Snackable and stackable, these crackers are a great standby at home or in the office.

 

 

 

Best Flavored Cracker: Wheat Thins Fiber Selects Garden Vegetable


Per 15 crackers: 120 calories, 4 g fat, 22 g carbohydrates, 5 g fiber, 2 g protein

These crackers, made from whole grain wheat flour, gives this tasty snack a massive hit of belly-filling fiber. Add them to your diet for a quick fix (and speaking of thin, cleanse out your toxins and lose weight with our Ultimate One-Day Detox.)

Best Potato Chips: Food Should Taste Good Sweet Potato Tortilla Chips

Per 12 chips: 140 calories, 7 g fat, 18 g carbohydrates, 1 g fiber, 2 g protein
Part chip, part cracker, and all good. These nibbles provide 20 percent of your daily dose of vitamin A, and they’re gluten-free.

Best Vegetable Chips: Terra Exotic Harvest Vegetable Chips


Per oz (about 16 chips): 130 calories, 6 g fat, 16 g carbohydrates, 2 g protein, 3 g fiber

This fun mix of carrots, blue potatoes, and kabocha squash boasts 40 percent less fat than potato chips and enough fiber to take the edge off your hunger. (Plus they look pretty on the chip ’n’ dip platter.)

Best Pretzels: Newman’s Own Organics Spelt Pretzels

Per 20 pretzels: 120 calories, 1 g fat, 23 g carbohydrates, 4 g protein, 4 g fiber
Spelt is a grain related to wheat but with more fiber and protein, and the fact that it’s organic is just a bonus. Pair these with a hunk of cheddar to rope even more protein into your snack break. (Just don’t eat too much salt. Avoid these Bloaty Foods That Make You Look Fat.)

Best Popcorn: Orville Redenbacher’s Smart Pop! Pop Up Bowl Butter


Per 6.5 cup serving: 120 calories, 2 g fat, 25 g carbohydrates, 4 g fiber, 4 g protein

The mini bags serve a dual function: They keep you from overeating and they do away with the need for a popcorn bowl. Keep a few bags tucked into your desk at work, and a fiber-rich snack will never be far from reach. If you want an even lighter alternative, we have another popcorn you should check out in our collection of the 4 Essential Snacks for Weight Loss.

Best Vegetable Dippers: Cal-Organic Carrot Dippers Snack Packs with Ranch Dip


Per package: 110 calories, 9 g fat, 5 g carbohydrates, 1 g protein, 1 g fiber

These baby carrots come with just enough ranch to kick up the flavor without burdening you with a nutritionally nullifying load of fat, and each serving has 60 percent of your day’s recommended vitamin A.

Best Plain Yogurt: Fage Total 2% Greek Yogurt


Per 7-ounce container: 150 calories, 4 g fat, 20 g protein

Greek yogurt has more than double the protein of standard American-style yogurt. Make it a simple parfait by adding fruit, nuts, seeds, or granola. Not all Greek yogurts are created equal. We found the Best & Worst Yogurts by type, so you could find the best one for your tastes.

Best Cottage Cheese: Fiber One Lowfat Cottage Cheese with Fiber


Per ½ cup: 80 calories, 2 g fat, 10 g protein, 5 g fiber

Cottage cheese is famous for its abundant supply of complete protein, but the 5 grams of fiber come from the addition of a natural plant compound called inulin. Top your curds with canned or fresh fruit for an ultra-sweet snack (or dessert!).

 

Best Snack Bread: Pepperidge Farm Swirl 100% Whole-Wheat Cinnamon with Raisins


Per slice: 80 calories, 1 g fat, 3 g protein, 2 g fiber

Cinnamon toast is usually little more than sugar and starch, a decadent duo with love-handle repercussions. Go with the whole wheat variety and you can snack without the guilt, even if you opt for a second slice.

Best Spreadable Cheese: The Laughing Cow Light Mozzarella, Sun-Dried Tomato & Basil


Per wedge: 35 calories, 1.5 g fat, 2 g protein

Keep one of these cheese wheels in the office fridge to fight on-the-job hunger. Spread a couple wedges over whole wheat crackers and you hit both major benchmarks of satiety: protein and fiber.

Best Chocolate Milk: Organic Valley Lowfat Chocolate Milk


Per 8 fl oz: 150 calories, 2.5 g fat, 9 g protein

Chocolate milk is the perfect drinkable snack before you head in for a workout. The sugar fuels your muscles for maximum power, and the protein helps rebuild them afterward. If this is your go-to snack, you have to click here for our Chocolate Milk Diet (it really works)!

Best Flavored Yogurt: Chobani Nonfat Blueberry Greek Yogurt

Dannon LIGHT & FIT® GREEK

Per 1 container: 80 calories, 0 g fat, 12 g protein, 7 g sugar
Scoop into the plump, juicy blueberries beneath our creamy Greek nonfat yogurt and give it a swirl for a treat that tastes so satisfying, you won’t sacrifice a thing.

Best Peanut Butter: Smucker’s Natural Chunky Peanut Butter


Per 2 Tbsp: 210 calories, 16 g fat, 7 g protein, 2 g fiber

You’ll find no added oils, sweeteners, or fillers in this jar—just peanuts and salt. Stay within the snack-size calorie range by eating one tablespoon with crackers or two tablespoons with baby carrots or celery.

Best Alternative Nut Butter: MaraNatha Organic Raw Almond Butter, No Salt, Creamy


Per 2 Tbsp: 190 calories, 17 g fat, 7 g protein, 4 g fiber

Almond butter has more heart-healthy monounsaturated fatty acids than peanut butter, and it’s just as convenient. Try smearing some over apple slices for a tasty blend of sweet and savory. Almond butter is just one of our 10 Best Brainpower-Boosting Secret Foods

Best Hummus: Sabra Sun Dried Tomato Hummus


Per 2 Tbsp: 70 calories, 4.5 g fat, 2 g protein, 1 g fiber

If you don’t already keep hummus stocked in your fridge, add it to your shopping list right now. The creamy puree of chickpeas and sesame seeds carries a balanced mix of protein, fiber, and healthy fat, and it pairs well with just about anything you can dip.

Veggie Pirate’s Booty

Calories: 130, Serving Size: 101 puffs, 0g Trans Fat per Serving

Crafted from puffed rice, corn, and a medley of fresh vegetables including spinach, kale, carrots and parsley, all baked to perfection.

Trader Joe’s Mini Ice Cream Cones


Calories: 70, Serving Size: 1 cone,  Sugars: 5g

 An ice cream cone with only 70 calories?  Oh, yes.  It’s small, you say?  Well, yes, indeed it is small in stature. But flavor? Big.  Oh, yes. Trader Joe’s Hold the Cone! Mini Ice Cream Cones are big on flavor. Each easy-to-hold wafer cone (nifty how we incorporated this practical information into the name, don’t you think?) is filled with rich, creamy, ice cream – ice cream, we hasten to add, that’s significantly richer and creamier than what you’ll find in other cones – dipped in a rich, chocolaty coating.  They’re simple, for sure; and oh-so wonderfully satisfying.

Article Source: http://www.shape.com/


An estimated 20 percent of overweight and obese Americans have lost weight and kept it off — which might make you feel alternately inspired and a little underwhelmed.

There are a lot of opinions about losing weight, but what many dieters learn firsthand is that it can be just as difficult, if not more so, to maintain that weight loss, and yet the discussion surrounding maintenance is noticeably quieter.

The National Weight Control Registry was founded in 1994 to try to further that discussion. The Registry’s goal is to identify successful weight loss maintainers and study the habits, behaviors, skills and attitudes they share. Currently, the Registry tracks more than 10,000 Americans over the age of 18 who have maintained at least a 30-pound weight loss for a year or longer.

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Both men and women often experience the joy of shedding countless pounds of water weightduring first few weeks of their diet. As they step onto the scale, they are dazzled by losing a total of 10 pounds within just a few days.

Even though these numbers often fluctuate and do not equate to pure fat loss, getting rid of excess liquids can produce surprising changes! You will note a sleeker and much slimmer figure!

Although real fat loss requires time and persistence, a safe drop in excessive water weight can give you an excellent quick reward for your efforts! Just get rid of those extra pounds with following tips and make your abs more toned, and your hips and waistline slimmer!

Way #1 – Go for 30 Minutes of Cardio

The first way to get rid of excessive water weight is to start sweating! My most critical advice is to engage in cardiovascular exercise as this will boost your heart rate and metabolism.

Thanks to increased metabolic rate your body will burn not only fat but any residual toxins in your body that contribute to retaining excess liquids!

Exercise for 30 to 60 minutes, as exceeding this limit will raise your cortisol levels! If you do not know, higher cortisol levels will hinder your weight loss altogether!
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