When eating out at a restaurant, navigate the danger zones, eat what you love, and stay at a healthy weight with this menu guide and calorie chart from FITNESS.

 

Dining Out

Going out to dinner tonight? You’ve got plenty of company. Almost 75 percent of us eat at a restaurant at least once a week, and 25 percent dine out every two or three days, according to a study by the USDA. And hey, why not? Letting someone else cook is relaxing — the perfect treat after a busy day. Trouble is, a recent study at the University of Texas found that female dieters consume an extra 253 calories and 16 fat grams on the days that they eat at restaurants. Portion sizes have ballooned in recent years — and most of us tend to polish off every bite. Research by FITNESS advisory board member Brian Wansink, PhD, director of the Cornell University Food and Brand Lab in Ithaca, New York, and author of Mindless Eating, shows that we keep nibbling until our plates are empty rather than waiting for our bodies to signal that we’re full, no matter how big the serving size.

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Pesce, the Italian word for fish, is being associated with people who add aquatic animals to a vegetarian diet. Pescetarians (sometimes called pesco-vegetarians) eat freshwater and saltwater fish and shellfish in addition to the fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, eggs, and dairy vegetarians typically consume.

While it isn’t known how many people follow a pescetarian eating pattern, interest in the impact this diet has on its followers appears to be rising. The combination of the known benefits of a vegetarian lifestyle with the proven health effects of omega-3-fatty-acid-rich fish makes pescetarianism a potentially powerful ally in the interplay between nutrition and long-term health.

Who Are Pescetarians?
“Pescetarians are a diverse group,” says Debra King, MS, RDN, LD, FAND, CEO of Crown Consulting and Web editor for Vegetarian Nutrition. “In my experience, they’re usually very health-conscious individuals. They’re looking to take control of their health through the food choices they make.” For some, pescetarianism may be a stepping stone on the way to true vegetarianism, or a compromise for vegetarians who feel the need to add a protein source readily available in business or social settings.

“People who have health problems or want to lose weight may try pescetarianism,” says Janis Jibrin, MS, RD, author of The Pescetarian Plan. “They’ve read about the detrimental health effects of red meat and the benefits of plant-based diets and omega-3 fatty acids in fish, and are looking for a convenient and doable way to make healthful choices.”

Components of the Diet
“The pescetarian diet is similar to the traditional Mediterranean diet: plant-based, with fish serving as the primary animal protein,” says Sharon Palmer, RDN, nutrition editor of Today’s Dietitian and author of Plant-Powered for Life. Like a Mediterranean eating pattern, a healthful pescetarian diet is loaded with fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts, and legumes. “It can be Mediterranean-style,” Jibrin says, “but one could just as easily have a Nordic- or Japanese-based pescetarian diet. It’s an extremely flexible way to eat. Also, most pescetarians, like vegetarians, include both dairy and eggs in their diets.”

Health Benefits
“There’s definitely evidence that a dietary pattern like this favorably impacts chronic disease,” Kris-Etherton says. In 2013, an analysis of the Adventist Health Study-2 reported that the mortality rate was lower among pescetarians when compared with nonvegetarians.1

“In addition, the study found that pescetarians had lower levels of blood cholesterol and blood pressure, as well as [decreased] risk of diabetes, blood pressure, and metabolic syndrome compared with nonvegetarians,” Palmer says. “They even have a lower carbon footprint.”

While few studies look specifically at pescetarianism, Jibrin says there are “boatloads of relevant studies” on the similar Mediterranean diet, vegetarianism, and the benefits of eating fish. “Lower risk of heart disease, less dementia and depression, smarter kids, lower rates of type 2 diabetes and cancer—the potential benefits are truly impressive,” Jibrin says.

 

One of the key health-promoting components of a pescetarian diet is the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids found in fish (particularly fatty fish). “There are many good epidemiologic studies showing that higher consumption of fish and omega-3 fatty acids is associated with a lower risk of heart disease,” Kris-Etherton says.

“Collectively, the evidence to date strongly suggests benefits of fish/seafood and marine omega-3 fatty acids for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease.” Data from the Cardiovascular Health Study indicated that in older adults, higher dietary intake of DHA and EPA (the long-chain fatty acids found in fish) may lower the risk of fatal heart attacks, and that higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids in the blood are associated with a lower incidence of congestive heart failure.2,3 “Some recent controlled clinical trials in patients with heart disease haven’t demonstrated a beneficial effect of fish oil,” Kris-Etherton notes. “For secondary prevention in coronary patients, modern pharmacotherapy appears to be of greater benefit over marine omega-3 fatty acids.”

Other research shows that eating fish may be good for the brain as well as the heart. “A long-term study in the UK [indicated] that children born to women who ate at least 12 oz of fish per week during pregnancy had higher IQs and better social, fine motor, and communication skills than kids whose moms ate fewer than 12 oz, and a study by Chicago’s Rush Institute for Healthy Aging found that over a four-year period, Chicagoans aged 65 to 94 who had at least one fish meal per week had a 60% lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease compared with those who rarely or never ate fish,” Jibrin says.

“It’s not just the presence of fish. It’s the presence of all those plant foods, too,” Palmer says. “This is a huge aspect of the health benefits seen in this diet style.” In a 2009 study, Fraser and colleagues concluded, “There is convincing evidence that vegetarians have lower rates of coronary heart disease, largely explained by low LDL cholesterol, probable lower rates of hypertension and diabetes mellitus, and lower prevalence of obesity. Overall, their cancer rates appear to be moderately lower than others living in the same communities, and life expectancy appears to be greater.”4 A study on the effects of a vegetarian diet on the risk of developing type 2 diabetes concluded that all variants of plant-based diets, including pescetarian, were associated with a substantially lower risk of type 2 diabetes and lower BMI than nonvegetarian diets.5 “It makes sense,” Palmer says. “As you increase your intake of plant foods, decrease your intake of red and processed meats, and prioritize fish—animal foods that contain better fat profiles and omega-3s—you’re likely to improve your overall health.”

Too Much Fish?
The presence of mercury and other toxins in fish, combined with environmental and sustainability concerns, raises questions about the viability of a fish-and-seafood-based diet. “Some studies have shown that the benefits of eating fish outweigh the risks related to mercury,” Palmer says. “Generally, the larger and more predatory the fish, the higher the mercury. I think dietitians can educate consumers to eat lower on the food chain when it comes to fish.” The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend adults eat 8 oz or more of seafood per week. Pregnant and breast-feeding women should aim for 8 oz to 12 oz of a variety of seafood, but should limit albacore tuna to 6 oz per week, and avoid tilefish, swordfish, shark, and King mackerel due to their high mercury content. The guidelines specifically recommend salmon, anchovies, herring, sardines, Pacific oysters, trout, and Atlantic and Pacific mackerel (not King mackerel) as choices higher in EPA and DHA and lower in mercury.6 These guidelines can fit well with a pescetarian eating pattern. “It’s important to remember that a pescetarian diet doesn’t mean that one should eat fish three times a day,” Palmer says. “It’s a vegetarian diet that includes fish. So that means lots of meals that are based on plant proteins, too—beans, lentils, tofu, nuts, seeds.”

When advocating for an increase in seafood intake, it’s essential to consider sustainability. According to the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch, overfishing, lack of effective management, and consumption habits all have contributed to a serious decline in wild fish. Seafoodwatch.org states that “Some 90% of the world’s fisheries are either fully fished or in decline.”7 “More and more experts and organizations, including Monterey Bay Aquarium and World Wildlife Fund, are indicating that sustainably farmed seafood has a role,” Palmer says. “Dietitians need to help their patients not only find good, safe sources of fish, but also help clients prioritize sustainable choices.” (See “Eating Seafood Sustainably” in Today’s Dietitian‘s June 2012 issue.)

Helping Clients Make the Switch
Jibrin recommends a pescetarian diet to clients who are interested in trying a more plant-based diet but aren’t ready to become vegetarian or vegan. “It’s a compromise that doesn’t compromise their health,” Jibrin says. According to Palmer, pescetarianism is a simple transition into a more plant-based lifestyle. “In my experience, I see many people who like to make small incremental changes in their diet and lifestyle, such as giving up red meat, doing Meatless Monday, or becoming pescetarian. They may find that as they try these lifestyle changes, they’re ready to embrace even more plant-based meals during the week.”

Variety is important in any diet, and so is overall diet quality, King says. While the components of a pescetarian eating plan are healthful, King says that eating fish seven days per week, consuming uncontrolled portions, and munching on deep-fried fish sticks still aren’t good choices. “I think it’s important to educate clients that a pescetarian diet does not mean they must eat fish at every meal,” Palmer says. “It means that a person enjoys lots of plant-based meals—vegetarian lasagna, veggie chili with cornbread, tofu vegetable stir-fry with brown rice—in addition to a few meals during the week based on fish.”

Many health-conscious Americans are looking for a dietary pattern that will give them the maximum proven nutritional benefit with the minimum sacrifice and inconvenience. With its focus on plant-based foods, pescetarianism delivers a powerful portion of vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals, fiber, and healthful fats. Adding fish and other seafood not only boosts intake of heart-healthy long-chain omega-3 fatty acids but also increases the variety of available lean proteins. Some guidance on how to build plant-based meals and choose sustainable, low-mercury fish can ease clients’ transition to delicious, nutritious, health-promoting pescetarianism.

— Judith C. Thalheimer, RD, LDN, is a freelance nutrition writer, a community educator, and the principal of JTRD Nutrition Education Services.

 

Sample Pescetarian Diet 1200 Calorie Meal Plan


Breakfast – Oatmeal and Eggs – 254 calories

1 packet high fiber oatmeal
2 hard boiled egg whites
1 cup or piece of fruit


Lunch – Tuna Sandwich – 350 calories

2 slices 100% whole wheat light bread
Tuna fish (4 ounces)
1 tablespoon light mayo
Light string cheese
1/2 cup baby carrots


Snack – Cheese and Crackers – 125 calories

Laughing Cow Cheese Wedge
19 Special K Crackers


Dinner – Tofu and Broccoli over Pasta – 435 calories

Tofu and Broccoli
3 ounces firm tofu & 1/2 cup broccoli
1 cup whole wheat pasta
Garden salad
2 tablespoon light balsamic


Dessert – No Sugar Added Fudgsicle – 40 calories

No Sugar Added Fudgsicle

Sample Pescetarian Diet 1500 Calorie Meal Plan


Breakfast – Oatmeal and Eggs – 394 calories

1 packet high fiber oatmeal
2 hard boiled egg whites
1/4 cup nuts


Snack AM – Fruit – 60 calories

1 cup cut fruit or 1 piece of fruit


Lunch – Tuna Sandwich – 350 calories

2 slices 100% whole wheat light bread
Tuna fish (4 ounces)
1 tablespoon light mayo
Light string cheese
1/2 cup baby carrots


Snack – Cheese and Crackers – 125 calories

Laughing Cow Cheese Wedge
19 Special K Crackers


Dinner – Tofu and Broccoli Over Pasta – 475 calories

Tofu and Broccoli
4 ounces firm tofu & 1/2 cup broccoli
1 cup whole wheat pasta
2 cups garden salad
2 tablespoons light balsamic


Dessert – Popcorn – 100 calories

1 mini bag microwave popcorn

 

 

 

 

 

Article originally posted at http://www.todaysdietitian.com/


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To know more about our summer social media contest and our medically supervised weight management program please contact us atoptimalweightcontrol@gmail.com


 

 

 

Everything you eat and drink matters. Find your healthy eating style and maintain it for a lifetime. Start with small changes to make healthier choices you can enjoy. The right mix can help you be healthier now and into the future.

To build your own healthy eating style, follow the MyPlate building blocks below. Each one has starter tips to inspire you to create your own solutions — “MyWins.” The key is choosing a variety of foods and beverages from each food group — and making sure that each choice is limited in sodium, saturated fat, and added sugars.
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In this post, we’ll explore what Tim Ferriss refer to as the “slow-carb diet”.

Here are the four simple rules I followed…

Rule #1: Avoid “white” carbohydrates

Avoid any carbohydrate that is — or can be — white. The following foods are thus prohibited, except for within 1.5 hours of finishing a resistance-training workout of at least 20 minutes in length: bread, rice, cereal, potatoes, pasta, and fried food with breading. If you avoid eating anything white, you’ll be safe.
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Good Sources Of Protein

Chicken (without skin)
Turkey (without skin)
Lean cuts of beef
Lean cuts of pork
Lean cuts of lamb
Lean cuts of veal
Eggs
Egg whites
Tuna fish
Salmon
Shrimp
Lobster
Flounder
Sardines
Snapper
Swordfish
Trout
Crab
Clams
Scallops
Milk (2% or skim)
Cottage cheese (low fat/non fat)
Yogurt (low fat/non fat)
Tofu
Black beans
Garbanzo beans (aka chick peas)
Kidney beans
Lentils
Lima beans
Navy beans
Pinto beans
Miso
Soybeans
Peanuts
Almonds
Cashews
Hazelnuts
Pecans
Pistachio nuts
Natural peanut butter
Pumpkin seeds
Sunflower seeds
Protein powder, protein shakes and protein bars. (I explain the purpose and benefits of these supplements here: Protein Powder)

Good Sources Of Carbs

Brown Rice
100% whole wheat bread
100% whole wheat bagels
100% whole wheat pita bread
Whole wheat/whole grain pasta
Sweet potatoes
Yams
Oatmeal
Buckwheat
Bulgur
Bran cereals
Garbanzo beans (aka chick peas)
Kidney beans
Black beans
Lentils
Navy beans
Pinto beans
Lima Beans

(Fruits And Vegetables)

Apple
Orange
Plum
Banana
Grapes
Strawberries
Peaches
Pears
Cantaloupe
Pineapple
Broccoli
Brussels sprouts
Cabbage
Asparagus
Spinach
Lettuce
Romaine lettuce
Avocado
Cucumber
Eggplant
Tomato
Cauliflower
Celery
Turnip
Bok choy
Mushrooms
Peppers
Green peas

Good Sources Of Fat

Salmon
Mackerel
Herring
Anchovies
Sardines
Scallops
Halibut
Fish oil supplements (It’s one of the only supplements I use and fully recommend. I explain why here: Fish Oil Supplements.)
Peanuts
Almonds
Walnuts
Cashews
Natural peanut butter
Olive oil (extra-virgin)
Flax seeds
Flax seed oil
Pumpkin seeds
Sunflower seeds

 

Article Source: http://www.theloseweightdiet.com/


 

Regardless of age, weight or athletic ability, aerobic activity is good for you. As your body adapts to regular aerobic exercise, you’ll get stronger and fitter.

Consider the following 10 ways that aerobic activity can help you feel better and enjoy life to the fullest.

Aerobic activity can help you:

  1. Keep excess pounds at bay Combined with a healthy diet, aerobic exercise helps you lose weight and keep it off.
  2. Increase your stamina Aerobic exercise may make you tired in the short term. But over the long term, you’ll enjoy increased stamina and reduced fatigue.
  3. Ward off viral illnesses Aerobic exercise may activate your immune system. This may leave you less susceptible to minor viral illnesses, such as colds and flu.
  4. Reduce your health risks Aerobic exercise reduces the risk of many conditions, including obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, stroke and certain types of cancer.

Weight-bearing aerobic exercises, such as walking, reduce the risk of osteoporosis.

  1. Manage chronic conditions Aerobic exercise may help lower blood pressure and control blood sugar. If you have coronary artery disease, aerobic exercise may help you manage your condition.
  2. Strengthen your heart A stronger heart doesn’t need to beat as fast. A stronger heart also pumps blood more efficiently, which improves blood flow to all parts of your body.
  3. Keep your arteries clear Aerobic exercise boosts your high-density lipoprotein (HDL), the “good,” cholesterol, and lowers your low-density lipoprotein (LDL), the “bad,” cholesterol. This may result in less buildup of plaques in your arteries.
  4. Boost your mood Aerobic exercise may ease the gloominess of depression, reduce the tension associated with anxiety and promote relaxation.
  5. Stay active and independent as you age Aerobic exercise keeps your muscles strong, which can help you maintain mobility as you get older.

Aerobic exercise also keeps your mind sharp. At least 30 minutes of aerobic exercise three days a week appears to reduce cognitive decline in older adults.

  1. Live longer Studies show that people who participate in regular aerobic exercise live longer than those who don’t exercise regularly.

 

Take the first step

Ready to get more active? Great. Just remember to start with small steps. If you’ve been inactive for a long time or if you have a chronic health condition, get your doctor’s OK before you start.

When you’re ready to begin exercising, start slowly. You might walk five minutes in the morning and five minutes in the evening.

The next day, add a few minutes to each walking session. Pick up the pace a bit, too. Soon, you could be walking briskly for at least 30 minutes a day and reaping all the benefits of regular aerobic activity.

Other options for aerobic exercise could include cross-country skiing, aerobic dancing, swimming, stair climbing, bicycling, jogging, elliptical training or rowing.

If you have a condition that limits your ability to participate in aerobic activities, ask your doctor about alternatives. If you have arthritis, for example, aquatic exercises may give you the benefits of aerobic activity without stressing your joints.

 

Article Source: http://www.mayoclinic.org/


 

Losing weight takes more than desire. It takes commitment and a well-thought-out plan. It’s easy to say that you want to lose weight. It’s also easy to find the motivation to hit the gym regularly and choose the right foods in the beginning. After a few weeks, our motivation seems to wane and those old, unhealthy habits of yours start to creep back in. What seemed so easy at first is now difficult. You have cravings. You’re tired. You miss those social dinners with your friends and doughnuts at the office. That 6 a.m. aerobics class doesn’t seem as fun, and getting up without hitting the snooze button seems impossible.

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There are 4 different body types and each type has unique hormonal and metabolic characteristics.  Some body types gain weight easily and are also more susceptible to cellulite. While experts categorized the 4 body shape as apples, bananas, pears shaped body… knowing which fruit your body most resembles can help you decide if you look best in boot-cut or straight-leg jeans, one author has developed another set of body types that he says can tell you about how your body works. Chiropractor Eric Berg, author of The 7 Principles of Fat Burning, explains his hormone-driven body types.

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Losing Weight with Green Coffee Beans A Detailed Review By Joe Leech, Dietitian

The latest buzz brewing in the nutrition world is the recent link between green unroasted coffee beans and weight loss. A recent study found that overweight individuals lost a significant percentage of their body weight in a short amount of time when they consumed green coffee bean supplements on a daily basis.

For this reason, people have turned to all sorts of supplements in order to make things easier.

Green Coffee Bean Extract is currently among the world’s most popular weight loss supplements.

As the name implies, this supplement is extracted from green coffee beans.

It contains a substance called Chlorogenic Acid, which is believed to be responsible for the weight loss effects.

Green coffee extract was promoted by Dr. Oz back in 2012. He is an American TV doctor and probably the most famous health “guru” in the world.

I’m a big fan of supplements in general, but I am extra skeptical when it comes to weight loss supplements because they almost never work as advertised.

This article takes a detailed look at Green Coffee Bean Extract… what it is, how it works and what the science has to say about it.

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