Having a well-planned grocery list gets you in and out of the store quickly and helps you stick to your healthy eating plan.

Organize your food shopping list and fill your grocery cart with the healthiest foods that won’t bust your budget or diet.

SUGAR

Maximum amount of added sugars you should eat in a day are:

Men: 150 calories per day (37.5 grams or 9 teaspoons)

Women: 100 calories per day (25 grams or 6 teaspoons)

Different names for sugar: Sugar, sucrose, high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), dehydrated cane juice, fructose, glucose, dextrose, syrup, cane sugar, raw sugar, corn syrup,

Other sugars fall into the same category often labeled healthy like:  agave, honey, organic cane sugar and coconut sugar

 

CARBOHYDRATES 

50-100 Grams Per Day – This range is great if you want to lose weight effortlessly while allowing for a bit of carbs in the diet. It is also a great maintenance range for people who are carb sensitive.

20-50 Grams Per Day – This is where the metabolic benefits really start to kick in. This is the perfect range for people who need to lose weight fast, or are metabolically deranged and have obesity or diabetes.

When eating less than 50 grams per day, your body will get into ketosis, supplying energy for the brain via so-called ketone bodies. This is likely to kill your appetite and cause you to lose weight automatically.

 

FIBER

30 to 38 grams a day – Men

25 grams a day – Women between 18 and 50 years old

 21 grams a day – If a woman is 51 and older.

Another general guideline is to get 14 grams of fiber for every 1,000 calories in your diet.

 

PROTEIN

56 grams per day – for the average sedentary man

46 grams per day – for the average sedentary woman

The DRI (Dietary Reference Intake) is 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight, or 0.36 grams per pound.

 

PROTEINS

  1. Chicken Breast Skinless
  2. Turkey Breast
  3. Lean Ground Turkey
  4. Top Round Turkey
  5. Eye of Round Steak
  6. 90% Ground Beef
  7. Egg Whites
  8. Egg Substitutes
  9. Tuna
  10. Swordfish
  11. Tofu
  12. Salmon
  13. Crab
  14. Lobster
  15. Low-Fat Cottage Cheese
  16. Lean Ham

CARBOHYDRATES

  1. Sweet Potato
  2. Yams
  3. Squash
  4. Corn
  5. Quinoa
  6. Brown Rice
  7. Wild Rice
  8. Beans/Lentils
  9. Oatmeal
  10. Rice cakes
  11. High-Fiber Cereal
  12. Popcorn (no butter)
  13. Tortillas (whole wheat or corn)
  14. Whole Grain Bread (no high fructose corn syrup)
  15. Fat-Free Yogurt
  16. Whole Wheat Pasta

VEGETABLES

  1. Broccoli
  2. Asparagus
  3. Lettuce
  4. Carrots
  5. Green Beans
  6. Green Peppers
  7. Mushrooms
  8. Spinach
  9. Tomatoes
  10. Peas
  11. Onions
  12. Brussels Sprouts
  13. Artichokes
  14. Cabbage
  15. Zucchini
  16. Jalapenos

FATS TO EAT

  1. Avocado
  2. Sunflower Seeds
  3. Pumpkin Seeds
  4. Cold Water Fish
  5. Low-Fat Cheese
  6. Low-Fat Salad Dressings
  7. Low Sodium Nuts
  8. Olives
  9. Olive oil
  10. Canola oil
  11. Sunflower oil
  12. Flaxseed oil

DRINKS

  1. Water
  2. Water with Lemon & Mint
  3. Detox or Spa Waters
  4. OWC Vanilla Slim Shake Gluten Free
  5. OWC Chocolate Slim Shake Gluten Free
  6. Mint Tea
  7. Almond Milk/Soy Milk/1% Reduced Fat Milk
  8. Perrier, Sparkling Water Plain
  9. Shaken Tazo Iced Passion Tea (Unsweetened)
  10. Caffe Americano
  11. Green Smoothie

FOODS  TO AVOID

  1. Butter
  2. Mayonnaise
  3. Fried Foods
  4. Whole-Fat Dairy
  5. Sugar-Based Beverages
  6. Sweet Desserts and Sweet Candies

What Causes Knee Soreness after Working Out?

by RACHEL NALL

You rely on your knees to support your movements during a workout. When you experience pain after exercising, you may be concerned that an underlying condition exists. Understanding why you experience knee pain after you exercise can be a matter of evaluating the types of exercises you are performing and the location of your pain. Learning when you can continue exercising with knee pain — and when you cannot — is important to your continued good health.

Post-Exercise Treatment

If you experience knee pain after exercising, take immediate steps to reduce inflammation. This includes icing your knee within 10 to 20 minutes after your workout. You also may wish to take an anti-inflammatory medication such as ibuprofen. Evaluate your footwear as well: lack of support, particularly arch support, often contributes to knee pain. Your physician or a shoe specialist can evaluate your shoes to ensure they are in good enough shape to continue exercising. If your knees continue to swell or the pain gets worse instead of better, you may need to take a few days from exercising and seek medical attention.

Impact Exercises

Your knees are the major shock absorbers of your body, absorbing the impact each time you take a step. If you participate in high-impact activities like running, volleyball or basketball, you are at increased risk for experiencing knee pain after exercising. If you experience pain in both knees after high-impact exercise, this may be a sign you need to alternate high- and low-impact activities. These include activities like exercising on an elliptical machine or swimming, which puts less strain on your knees. Incorporating these activities into your workout routine may help to take the pressure off your knees.

Strengthening Exercises

If a physician has evaluated your knee and determined you have not experienced a serious injury, you may wish to engage in some knee-strengthening exercises to reduce pain and restore stability to your knee. Examples of exercises include sitting with your legs extended and slowly lifting your leg about 6 to 8 inches off the ground. Repeat five to 10 times on each leg. From a seated position with your legs extended, you also can cross one leg over the other to stretch the outer portion of the knee. Hold for five seconds, then release the stretch and repeat on the opposite side. Your physician also may recommend alternate stretches to relieve tension in your knee.

Injuries

There are a number of bones, tendons and muscles related to the knee, providing ample opportunity for injury. You may experience conditions like runner’s knee, which causes pain behind the kneecap, and iliotibial band syndrome, which causes pain outside the knee. Both injury and overuse can cause you to experience knee pain. If your knee pain does not subside with rest, see your physician, who can evaluate your knee for potential injury. Knee pain does not always mean surgery — your physician can recommend several conservative approaches to treat pain.

Article Source: http://www.livestrong.com/


When eating out at a restaurant, navigate the danger zones, eat what you love, and stay at a healthy weight with this menu guide and calorie chart from FITNESS.

 

Dining Out

Going out to dinner tonight? You’ve got plenty of company. Almost 75 percent of us eat at a restaurant at least once a week, and 25 percent dine out every two or three days, according to a study by the USDA. And hey, why not? Letting someone else cook is relaxing — the perfect treat after a busy day. Trouble is, a recent study at the University of Texas found that female dieters consume an extra 253 calories and 16 fat grams on the days that they eat at restaurants. Portion sizes have ballooned in recent years — and most of us tend to polish off every bite. Research by FITNESS advisory board member Brian Wansink, PhD, director of the Cornell University Food and Brand Lab in Ithaca, New York, and author of Mindless Eating, shows that we keep nibbling until our plates are empty rather than waiting for our bodies to signal that we’re full, no matter how big the serving size.

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Do You Have a Hormone Imbalance?

 

Your Hormones, Your Health

Feeling bloated, irritable, or just not your best? A hormone imbalance could be to blame. Hormones are chemical “messengers” that impact the way your cells and organs function. It’s normal for your levels to shift at different times of your life, such as before and during your period or a pregnancy, or during menopause. But some medications and health issues can cause them to go up or down, too.

Irregular Periods

Most women’s periods come every 21 to 35 days. If yours doesn’t arrive around the same time every month, or you skip some months, it might mean that you have too much or too little of certain hormones (estrogen and progesterone). If you’re in your 40s or early 50s — the reason can be perimenopause — the time before menopause. But irregular periods can be a symptom of health problems like polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Talk to your doctor.

Sleep Problems

If you aren’t getting enough shut-eye, or if the sleep you get isn’t good, your hormones could be at play. Progesterone, a hormone released by your ovaries, helps you catch Zzz’s. If your levels are lower than usual, that can make it hard to fall and stay asleep. Low estrogen can trigger hot flashes and night sweats, both of which can make it tough to get the rest you need.

Chronic Acne

A breakout before or during your period is normal. But acne that won’t clear up can be a symptom of hormone problems. An excess of androgens (“male” hormones that both men and women have) can cause your oil glands to overwork. Androgens also affect the skin cells in and around your hair follicles. Both of those things can clog your pores and cause acne.

Memory Fog

Experts aren’t sure exactly how hormones impact your brain. What they do know is that changes in estrogen and progesterone can make your head feel “foggy” and make it harder for you to remember things. Some experts think estrogen might impact brain chemicals called neurotransmitters. Attention and memory problems are especially common during perimenopause and menopause. But they can also be a symptom of other hormone-related conditions, like thyroid disease. Let your doctor know if you’re having trouble thinking clearly.

Belly Problems

Your gut is lined with tiny cells called receptors that respond to estrogen and progesterone. When these hormones are higher or lower than usual, you might notice changes in how you’re digesting food. That’s why diarrhea, stomach pain, bloating, and nausea can crop up or get worse before and during your period. If you’re having digestive woes as well as issues like acne and fatigue, your hormone levels might be off.

Ongoing Fatigue

Are you tired all the time? Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms of a hormone imbalance. Excess progesterone can make you sleepy. And if your thyroid — the butterfly-shaped gland in your neck — makes too little thyroid hormone, it can sap your energy. A simple blood test called a thyroid panel can tell you if your levels are too low. If they are, you can get treated for that.

Mood Swings and Depression

Researchers think drops in hormones or fast changes in their levels can cause moodiness and the blues. Estrogen affects key brain chemicals like serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. But other hormones, that travel the same paths as neurotransmitters, also play a part in how you feel.

Appetite and Weight Gain

When you’re feeling blue or irritated, as you can be when your estrogen levels dip, you may want to eat more. That might be why drops in the hormone are linked to weight gain. The estrogen dip can also impact your body’s levels of leptin, a hunger-revving hormone.

Headaches

Lots of things can trigger these. But for some women, drops in estrogen bring them on. That’s why it’s common for headaches to strike right before or during your period, when estrogen is on the decline. Regular headaches or ones that often surface around the same time each month can be a clue that your levels of this hormone might be shifting.

Vaginal Dryness

It’s normal to have this occasionally. But if you often notice that you’re dry or irritated down there, low estrogen may be the reason. The hormone helps vaginal tissue stay moist and comfortable. If your estrogen drops because of an imbalance, it can reduce vaginal fluids and cause tightness.

Loss of Libido

Most people think of testosterone as a male hormone, but women’s bodies make it, too. If your testosterone levels are lower than usual, you might have less of an interest in sex than you usually do.

Breast Changes

A drop in estrogen can make your breast tissue less dense. And an increase in the hormone can thicken this tissue, even causing new lumps or cysts. Talk to your doctor if you notice breast changes, even if you don’t have any other symptoms that concern you.

 

 

5 Natural Ways to Balance Your Hormones

Many of my patients have found that certain lifestyle changes and simple techniques such as the ones below have allowed them to balance their hormones and reclaim health.

  1. Eat your broccoli. Cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, bok choy, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, and kohlrabi contain a substance called indole-3-carbinol (I3C), which is metabolized in the body to produce diindolylmethane (DIM). Both of these substances help modulate estrogens and have been shown to have some anti-cancer effects, particularly for breast cancer.
  2. Maintain a healthy weight. Excessive adipose (fat) tissue can act as an endocrine organ, producing more estrogen in the body. By maintaining a healthy weight, your body is not stimulated to overproduce certain hormones.
  3. Include phytoestrogens in your diet. Found in soy foods, flax seeds, sunflower seeds, bean sprouts, and legumes such as garbanzo beans and peas, phytoestrogens are plant-based substances that can help balance your hormones naturally.

Although there has been some controversy in the media over the consumption of soy, I do not know of any scientific studies showing that eating soy-containing foods is harmful. My view is that consuming small amounts of soy in the diet can be beneficial. However, I would advise against taking phytoestrogens such as soy as supplements as we do not know enough about the effects of taking these compounds in high doses. Also, I caution against eating processed soy products and soy additives in many foods, but instead encourage the use of traditional soy foods such as tofu, edamame, tempeh, miso, and soy sauce.  Make sure they are organic and non-GMO.

If you have known thyroid disease, I would also caution against eating foods that contain phytoestrogens raw as goitrogens in these foods may interfere with thyroid function. Cooking does neutralize this effect, but avoid consumption within two hours of taking any thyroid medication.

  1. Consider the use of herbal remedies. In my practice, the Ayurvedic herb shatavari has been useful for both menopausal hot flashes and PMS associated with irritability and mood swings. Other herbal remedies have also proven helpful for both physical and psychological symptoms. As each individual is different, always speak with a trained practitioner before using herbal remedies.
  2. Breathe deeply. Doing fifteen  minutes of deep belly breathing twice daily has been shown in several clinical trials to decrease hot flashes and night sweats as well as improve a woman’s sense of well-being. In addition, I encourage women (and men) to learn a mind-quieting technique such as Primordial Sound Meditation, which helps decrease stress hormones and allows the body to function more efficiently.

Addressing lifestyle including diet, physical activity and stress management as well as gaining support from practitioners and loved ones is an excellent start.  In addition to helping with hormonal balance, these mind-body techniques to bring about balance create a greater sense of well being and ultimately optimum health.

Schedule your visit today at Optimal Weight Control & Wellness Center, a medically supervised program designed to cater patients who have excess body fat induced by imbalance hormones.

 

Article References: http://www.webmd.com/

 


Why Are We Fat? Is It Gluttony, or Is Your Fat Actually Hungry?

What if everything you ever learned about weight loss was wrong? What if losing weight has nothing to do with calories—counting them or cutting them out by sheer willpower? What if, in fact, most health professionals (including doctors and dietitians), our own government and especially the food industry are giving us weight loss advice guaranteed to make us fat?

Here’s their mantra: “Eat less and exercise more. The secret to weight loss is energy balance. There are no good or bad calories. It’s all about moderation.”

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If you’ve been spending any time at the gym, you’ve probably seen (or done) more than a few sets of these strength-training moves. These exercises are trainer and fitness-buff favorites for balancing and strengthening the body; they are also effective when it comes to shaping, toning, and whittling. Learn how to do these essential exercises in time to add them to your shape-up routine!

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Every dieter knows that cooking and weight loss are practically synonymous. But when you have a jam-packed schedule or are just too tired to be bothered, it can feel like a major effort to deal with a guilt-free meal.

When you plan meals, you’re less likely to give in to take-out temptation. You’re also less likely to fall back into old, unhealthy habits, like reaching for a box of processed food, packed with excess calories, fat, sodium, and sugar. Invest a few minutes before each weekly grocery trip to plan out meals. Here are weight loss recipes that will jump-start your meal planning!

BREAKFAST


1. Vanilla Quinoa and Roasted Blueberry Breakfast Bowl

Our healthy cereal offers everything you need, from protein to complex carbs, to start your day off right—and all for 220 calories.

 


2. Breakfast Yogurt Parfait 

Whether you eat this at home or on the go, this recipe delivers protein and fruit in a breakfast that’s less than 190 calories.

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Are you up or down? It’s not just your mood, but also your weight that can be affected by depression. These tips can help you regain balance.

4-obese-man-is-sad-600x350

Which comes first, obesity or depression? Just like “the chicken or the egg” scenario, the underlying problem with depression and weight gain (or weight loss) can be hard to tell. Symptoms of depression and weight management issues are linked, and the relationship is a two-way street. In fact, a study done in the Netherlands found that obesity increases the risk for depression in initially non-depressed people by 55 percent, and depression increases the risk for obesity in initially normal-weight people by 58 percent.
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A Lipotropic injection contains a solution of lipotropic nutrients that are made up of one or more of the followingfat burning compounds: choline, inositol, methionine, amino acids, vitamin b12 and other vitamins and minerals. Each of these properties are important because they each have a key role in utilizing fat, distributing energy, and removing toxins from the body.

Many medical weight loss programs, medical professionals, fitness and health trainers, and nutritionists implement lipotropic shots into their patient’s and client’s health program and routine to aid in losing weight and to provide numerous other benefits that comes from a healthy blast of nutrients.

The overall effect of Lipotropic injections is enhanced weight loss, particularly when they are combined with a healthy diet and exercise program.
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In this post, we’ll explore what Tim Ferriss refer to as the “slow-carb diet”.

Here are the four simple rules I followed…

Rule #1: Avoid “white” carbohydrates

Avoid any carbohydrate that is — or can be — white. The following foods are thus prohibited, except for within 1.5 hours of finishing a resistance-training workout of at least 20 minutes in length: bread, rice, cereal, potatoes, pasta, and fried food with breading. If you avoid eating anything white, you’ll be safe.
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